Four House Judiciary members say they will ‘move forward’ with impeachment | TheHill – The Hill

Four House Judiciary Committee Democrats said in a Friday op-ed that they will “move forward” with an impeachment effort against President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump to host 9/11 first responders at victim fund bill signing next week Turkey is not the center of the world — but it has our attention Photo of Mexican National Guard halting crying migrant mother and child goes viral MORE.

Democratic Reps. David CicillineDavid Nicola CicillineHouse Democratic leadership member backs impeachment inquiry Hillicon Valley: DOJ opens tech antitrust probe | Facebook, Amazon set lobbying records | Barr attacks encryption as security risk | NSA to create new cybersecurity arm Top House Dem accuses tech giants of giving deceptive answers at antitrust hearing MORE (R.I.), Pramila JayapalPramila JayapalHouse leaves for six-week August recess Mueller testimony fails to move needle on impeachment Progressive activist: Sanders ‘at his best when he’s an angry old man’ MORE (Wash.), Mary Gay ScanlonMary Gay ScanlonHere are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment GOP leader, Ocasio-Cortez give boost to lawmaker pay hike Pelosi uses Trump to her advantage MORE (Pa.) and Veronica EscobarVeronica EscobarMore than 1,400 Jewish clergy call on Trump, Congress to allow asylum seekers into US The Hill’s Morning Report — DOJ’s planned executions stir new debate House leaves for six-week August recess MORE (Texas) wrote in an op-ed published in The Atlantic that after former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerDemocrats express private disappointment with Mueller testimony Kellyanne Conway: ‘I’d like to know’ if Mueller read his own report Graham: Mueller was ‘pretty much a figurehead’ of investigation MORE’s testimony on Capitol Hill this week, “it is up to Congress to act.”

“Our investigation will seriously examine all the evidence as we consider whether to bring articles of impeachment or other remedies under our Article I powers,” the four Democrats wrote. “Our Constitution requires it. Our democracy depends on it.”

The lawmakers noted that the Judiciary panel has filed an application in court to obtain grand jury documents referenced in Mueller’s report, adding they plan to obtain “additional underlying evidence, as well as enforce subpoenas for key witness testimony, and broaden our investigations to include conflicts of interest and financial misconduct.”

“Congress has patiently tried to work within traditional means to get to the bottom of this extraordinary situation,” the lawmakers wrote. “Committees have called witnesses and requested evidence, only to be stonewalled by Trump and his associates. The president’s refusal to comply with the Constitution, statutes, and established congressional oversight defies the rule of law.”

The Democrats called Mueller’s testimony before the House Judiciary and Intelligence panels this week a “watershed moment” that came three months after his team released its 448-page report detailing findings from its two-year investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election and possible obstruction of justice by Trump.

“When the redacted report finally became available to Congress and the American people, it painted a damning picture of a corrupt president who welcomed and encouraged an attack on our country, capitalized on it, and then tried to cover up what he had done,” the lawmakers wrote. “At this point, it is up to Congress to act on the evidence of multiple counts of obstruction of justice committed by the president, and to continue our investigation into whether he has committed other high crimes and misdemeanors.”

While Mueller’s testimony revealed little new information, House Democrats have signaled they are moving forward with lawsuits and subpoenas in the wake of the testimony, even as their caucus remains divided over launching an impeachment inquiry into the president.

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerMueller will be remembered for his weak testimony, not his shocking report Mueller Day falls flat Nadler: DOJ directive to Mueller is part of ‘ongoing cover up’ from Trump administration MORE (D-N.Y.) has said the panel is seeking the underlying Mueller evidence and that lawmakers would decide whether to recommend articles of impeachment against Trump.

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