Free-range chicken eggs provide more vitamin D – NY Daily News – New York Daily News


Free-range eggs put in the sun in sunny-side-up.


Eggs from chickens that are allowed to roam rather than being kept in dark sheds or cages pack more vitamin D, says a study from the University of Reading’s “Food Chemistry” journal in the United Kingdom.


Scientists analyzed the contents of 270 eggs sold at U.K. supermarkets and found that free-range eggs had 30% more vitamin D than eggs from birds kept locked up.

The sun will come out tomorrow for these chickens, all to make your scrambled eggs better.

The sun will come out tomorrow for these chickens, all to make your scrambled eggs better.

(Seth Perlman/ASSOCIATED PRESS)


Vitamin D, known as the sunshine vitamin, is primarily absorbed through exposure to sunlight. And the free-range chickens had more time in the sun.


Only a few foods, including eggs (specifically the yolk), are a good source of vitamin D. Other natural sources include red meat, liver, tuna, herring, salmon, and shrimp. Vitamin D is often added to milk, cereal, and yogurt.

A NOV. 16, 2009 FILE PHOTO

Caged chickens don’t get to see much of the outside world, so their vitamin D intake is much less than free-range birds.

(Charlie Neibergall/AP)


The study in the U.K. was focused on determining the importance of correct food labelling when purchases are made via the “production system.”


Vitamin D helps prevent rickets, regulates calcium intake and the immune system, and can help fight depression.

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featured lifestyle
eggs
food studies
health studies

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