North Carolina coast told to shelter in place as Hurricane Dorian hits with high winds, rain – NBC News

Hundreds of thousands were without power and North Carolinians were told to shelter in place as Hurricane Dorian, still a powerful Category 2 storm, drenched the coasts of the Carolinas on Thursday on its way to possible landfall in North Carolina.

Almost 240,000 households and businesses were without power, most of them in counties along the South Carolina coast and immediately inland, and many roads were closed by flooding.

Full coverage: Latest stories and video on Hurricane Dorian

“It has only started. We have a long night ahead of us,” Gov. Roy Cooper said in urging North Carolinians to shelter in place.

“Get to safety and stay there,” Cooper said. “This won’t be a brush-by. Whether it comes ashore or not, the eye of the storm will be close enough to cause extensive damage in North Carolina.”



The Latest on Dorian:

  • At 7 p.m. Thursday, the hurricane, which had weakened to Category 2, was about 55 miles southeast of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, and was moving northeast at about 10 mph.
  • The storm had maximum sustained winds of about 105 mph.
  • At least 23 people have died in the Bahamas, according to the health minister, and more deaths are expected to be reported.
  • Forecasters said Dorian was expected to remain close to the South Carolina coast for several more hours before it moves near or possibly even makes landfall over the North Carolina coast late Thursday or Friday.

Dorian was about 55 miles southeast of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, early Thursday evening, with maximum sustained winds of 105 mph. Tropical storm-force winds extended 220 miles from the eye, and a gust of 78 mph was recorded at Frying Pan Shoals, North Carolina, near Cape Fear, the National Hurricane Center reported.

The storm was moving northeast at about 10 mph and was expected to remain close to the South Carolina coast for several more hours before it moves near or possibly even makes landfall over the North Carolina coast late Thursday or Friday, forecasters said.

Flash floods were reported along the coasts of both Carolinas, the National Hurricane Center reported. It said “significant, life-threatening flash flooding” was expected as far north as southeast Virginia through the night.

Officials in Georgetown County, South Carolina, suspended all emergency services until winds subside enough to ensure safety, NBC affiliate WMBF of Myrtle Beach reported. People calling 911 were being added to a list to be responded to later, authorities said.

Most of Horry County, South Carolina’s fifth-biggest county, imposed curfews beginning at 7 p.m. through at least 7 a.m. Friday.

Comments

Write a Reply or Comment:

Your email address will not be published.*