President Trump Calls On Congress To Pass Gun Control Legislation – NPR

President Trump disembarks Air Force One with First Lady Melania Trump, on Aug, 4, 2019 after two mass shootings over the weekend. Trump has called for “strong background checks” in response to the shootings.

Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images


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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump disembarks Air Force One with First Lady Melania Trump, on Aug, 4, 2019 after two mass shootings over the weekend. Trump has called for “strong background checks” in response to the shootings.

Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Updated at 9:21 a.m. ET

President Trump will deliver remarks this morning from the White House in response to the deadly shootings over the weekend in El Paso and Dayton that killed 29 people.

In what might be a preview of his speech, Trump, in a series of tweets called on Congress to pass gun control legislation, saying the victims shouldn’t die in vain.

“Republicans and Democrats must come together and get strong background checks, perhaps marrying…this legislation with desperately needed immigration reform,” Trump tweeted.

“We must have something good, if not GREAT, come out of these two tragic events!” Trump concluded.

The alleged shooter in El Paso is believed to be the author of an anti-immigrant manifesto. It’s not clear why, in the wake of that, Trump is now talking about linking gun legislation with immigration reform. Those have been two of the most politically intractable issues in recent years, with bipartisan efforts ultimately failing.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) called on Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) to bring the Senate, which is out on recess, back “for an emergency session to put the House-passed universal background checks legislation on the Senate floor for debate and a vote immediately.”

Earlier this year the Democratically controlled House passed two bills aimed at making the background check system more stringent, with the support of a handful of Republicans. One would require background checks for all person to person gun sales. The other would extend the amount of time gun dealers must wait for a response from the federal background check system. It is currently three days and the House bill would make it ten days. The Senate has not moved to take up either measure.

In the wake of the shootings, Senator Pat Toomey (R-Penn.) tried to revive legislation he co-sponsored following the Sandy Hook school shooting to close what’s known as the “gun show loophole.”

“While no law will end mass shootings entirely, it’s time for Congress to act to help keep our communities safer,” Toomey tweeted. “We should start by passing bipartisan proposals such as my legislation with Senator Joe Manchin to expand background checks to all commercial firearm sales.”

The 2013 Toomey-Manchin bill was the last major bipartisan effort at new gun control legislation and it failed to overcome a filibuster in the Senate.

In remarks Sunday in New Jersey on his way home from a weekend at his Bedminster golf resort, President Trump talked about mental health as a factor in the shootings. That’s something he has done after past mass shootings as well. And it might also hint at an avenue for possible legislation. Trump ally Senator Lindsay Graham (R-SC) is calling for a red-flag law, also known as an extreme risk protective order. Some states, including California, have passed such laws allowing law enforcement to temporarily take guns away from people deemed a risk to themselves or others. President Trump’s daughter and senior advisor Ivanka Trump endorsed the idea as well on Sunday.

In a later tweet, Trump seemed to blame the media for the rise in mass shootings. “Fake News has contributed greatly to the anger and rage that has built up over many years,” Trump wrote.

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