Study: More than Half of College Football Athletes Have Inadequate Levels of Vitamin D – Deficiency Linked to Muscle … – PR Newswire (press release)

Dr. Rodeo and colleagues set out to determine if there was a relationship between serum vitamin D levels and lower extremity muscle strains and core muscle injury, or “sports hernia,” in college football players. The study included athletes participating in the National Football League Scouting Combine, where coaches, general managers and scouts evaluate top college football players hoping to make it into the big leagues.  

The study, presented at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting on March 16, included 214 college athletes who took part in the 2015 combine. Baseline data was collected, including age, body mass index (BMI), injury history, and whether they had missed any games due to a lower extremity muscle strain or core muscle injury.  

The average age of the athletes was 22. Their vitamin D levels were determined with a blood test. Levels were defined as normal (≥ 32 ng/mL), insufficient (20 – 31 ng/mL), and deficient (< 20 ng/mL).

A total of 126 players (59 %) were found to have an abnormal serum vitamin D level, including 22 athletes (10 %) with a severe deficiency.  Researchers found a significantly higher prevalence of lower extremity muscle strain and core muscle injury in those who had low vitamin D levels. Fourteen study participants reported missing at least one game due to a strain injury, and 86 % of those players were found to have inadequate vitamin D levels.

“Our primary finding is that NFL combine athletes at greatest risk for lower extremity muscle strain or core muscle injury had lower levels of vitamin D. This could be related to physiologic changes that occur to muscle composition in deficient states,” Dr. Rodeo explained. “Awareness of the potential for vitamin D inadequacy could lead to early recognition of the problem in certain athletes. This could allow for supplementation to bring levels up to normal and potentially prevent future injury,” Dr. Rodeo notes.

While the findings are significant for high performing athletes, there may be a message for the general population as well, according to Dr. Rodeo. Adequate vitamin D is essential for musculoskeletal structure, function and strength. But by some estimates, more than 40 percent of the U.S. population is deficient in vitamin D.

Sometimes called the “sunshine vitamin,” it is produced by the skin when exposed to sunlight. Sun avoidance and the use of sunscreen may in part account for low vitamin D levels in the population. Milk and fortified foods, including orange juice and some cereals, can also provide vitamin D, but one would need to consume a large amount of these foods. When individuals are found to have a deficiency, vitamin D supplements are usually prescribed.

“Although our study looked at high performance athletes, it’s probably a good idea for anyone engaging in athletic activities to give some thought to vitamin D,” Dr. Rodeo says. “Indeed, adequate levels of vitamin D are important to maintain good muscle and bone health in people of all ages.”

About Hospital for Special Surgery
Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) is the world’s leading academic medical center focused on musculoskeletal health. HSS is nationally ranked No. 1 in orthopedics and No. 2 in rheumatology by U.S. News & World Report (2016-2017), and is the first hospital in New York State to receive Magnet Recognition for Excellence in Nursing Service from the American Nurses Credentialing Center four consecutive times. HSS has one of the lowest infection rates in the country. HSS is an affiliate of Weill Cornell Medical College and as such all Hospital for Special Surgery medical staff are faculty of Weill Cornell. The hospital’s research division is internationally recognized as a leader in the investigation of musculoskeletal and autoimmune diseases. Hospital for Special Surgery is located in New York City and online at www.hss.edu.

 

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/study-more-than-half-of-college-football-athletes-have-inadequate-levels-of-vitamin-d—deficiency-linked-to-muscle-injuries-300422304.html

SOURCE Hospital for Special Surgery

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